Tag Archives: world

Dangerous Yahoos

PLAYLIST
In The Hall Of The Mountain King – The Marimba Belles
Planet of Lost Souls – Thomas Dolby
Transparencias – M.I.A.
Vassarlean – Charles Mingus
The Insidious Revenge Of Ultima Thule Part One – Birdsongs Of The Mesozoic
Rhubarb – Aphex Twin
Ladino Song – Oi Va Voi
Ravendhi – Cirque Du Soleil
Mamelukki & Musta Leski – Alamaailman Vasarat
Pull Jabal Pull – JJ Johnson
Memory Band – Rotary Connection
Shapes Of Things – David Bowie
Mars, The Bringer of War – Isao Tomita
Kula Bocca Says So – The Residents
Glue – 5uu’s
Expectativa – Asfalto
The Fish [Shindleria Praematurus] – Yes
C’est La Vie Qui Les A Menés Là! – Magma
Cryogenese Les Portes Du Futur – Art Zoyd
Awake – Mungal with Nitin Sahwney
Sound Music – DJ Babu
My God – Jethro Tull

Despite all the ridiculous fearmongering and conspiracymongering, our government continues to prove itself to be remedial and stunted in so many ways.

The Department’s leadership did not attempt to cover up information or mislead Congress about it…. (and is) announcing additional personnel changes today.

Either way, it seems that Romney and Obama are no different on the severe issues. Either way we end up with the same old game.

Via the blackagendareport.com:

1. 40 year war on drugs must continue, and even mention of the prison state is unthinkable

2. No minimum wage increases for you, no right to form a union, no right to negotiate or strike if you already have a union, and no enforcement or reform of existing labor laws.

3. No Medicare For All. Forget about it eliminating the Medicare age requirement so that all Americans would qualify.

4. Immigrants must be jailed and deported in record numbers.

5. FCC should not and must not regulate telecoms to ensure that poor and rural communities have access to internet, or to guarantee network neutrality.

6. Oil and energy companies, and other mega-polluters must be freed to drill offshore almost everywhere

7. US Presidents can kidnap citizens of their own or any nation on earth from anyplace on the planet for torture, indefinite imprisonment without trial or murder them and neighboring family and bystanders at will.

8. Africa should be militarized, destabilized, plundered and where necessary, invaded by proxy armies like those of Rwanda, Ethiopia, Burundi or Kenya, or directly by Western air and ground forces, as in Libya.

9. Palestinians should be occupied, Iran should be starved and threatened from all sides, Black and brown babies and their parents, relatives and neighbors should be bombed with drones in Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia

The “militants” targeted by the United States are often just military-aged men who happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time. Obama’s kill list–his program of extrajudicial killings, directed at American citizens suspected of terrorism—is an affront to the values of the Constitution, and a huge blemish on his record. The same goes for his failure to prosecute Bush-era tortue abuses, as well as his zeal for whistleblower prosecutions. And it’s certainly not helping our image in the region.

10. Banksters and Wall Street speculators deserve their bailouts and protection from criminal liability, but underwater and foreclosed homeowners deserve nothing.

11.  Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement. (because NAFTA was so great)

12. Climate change treaties and negotiations that might lead to them should be avoided at all costs.

13. Medicare, Medicaid and social security are “entitlements” that need to be cut to relieve what they call “the deficit.”

14. any sort of WPA-style program to put millions of people back to work.

In fact, despite his promises to the contrary, Obama’s administration has been one of the least transparent in history, with 19 out of 20 cabinet-level agencies failing to follow the requirements of the FOIA. And those drone strikes can be a mere mistaken identity or accidental button-pushing away.

“I remember cuing up a US Predator strike before deciding the computer screen wasn’t depicting a Taliban insurgent burying an improvised explosive device in the road; rather, a child playing in the dirt.” –James Jeffrey 

The National Constitution Center has found that one-third of the United States actually “extremely concerned” or “very concerned” about the future of their privacy given the very real possibility of rampant drone use in the US in the coming years.

These drones, btw, are one of the main reasons we’re so disliked in the middle east, despite any claims that it was some shoddy video, and regardless of Romney’s crass politicizing. As always, these issues are more complicated than that, (free speech included).

We now know that a concerted terrorist attack was at work, not just some street riots, and not some simplistic, xenophobic, bigoted, jingoist rhetoric generalizing the people in the region:

“WHY DO THEY HATE US?” “WHY ARE THEY SO EASILY OFFENDED”

There are many real reasons, from our decades of bad foreign policy, equation with Israel’s racist neoconservative regime, Drone strikes, economic inequity, wars, Global food prices… Not to mention the anti-Islam ads by our own moronic politicians, and the ghastly actions of a few servicemen.

Israeli leaders keep pushing for war, Obama threatens the Iranian president, Romney lusts even harder for bombs over the middle east, and racist campaigns to dehumanize Palestinians have come to America.

“In any war between the civilized man and the savage, support the civilized man. Support Israel. Defeat Jihad.” – Pamela Geller, American Freedom Defense Initiative (hate group)

Oh, and if you try to cover or take down those racist sentiments, you’re arrested for vandalism.

The elections are a joke, with both candidates running further right than the electorate, and the liar Romney now more unpopular than Bush.

It’s no wonder the GOP has to resort to conspiracy theory, dangerous assertionsthe blame game, and outright lies to explain why they’re losing, and why they’re so unpopular.

Fact: when you use ‘unskewed’ numbers to look at NET job growth in America, Obama has created more jobs. Americans are feeling better about the state of the U.S. economy, and may not even be focusing on those monthly jobs reports as much as Fox News wants them to.

Let’s face it, whether the Republicans win or lose, they’re still losers. And most of the politicians, no matter their party affiliation, are fiscal and moral hypocrites.

Americans hold our system of government up as a model for other nations, but we show contempt for it at home.

A shadowy money explosion controls all of this theatre, with a sort of short-sighted conspiracy that doesn’t account for the dangerous and catastrophic complexities of real geopolitics. Most of the money is going to the most austere conservatives and greedy corpofascists, and the rest can just take over our democracy on the state and local levels. Income inequality in the United States is worse today than it was back in 1774. And the thinking that engineers this system is dogmatic and self-interested.

Can the ideology of capitalism bend to a stronger ideology of justice and love? -Joseph Stiglitz, Nobel Prize-winner

These money-grubbers will steal our election if we’re not vigilant.

They will mobilize against the people if we do not stand up and block them.

Spying on Muslims and Fabricating the Results, Targeting Activists (NYPD has been targeting anybody who tries to hold them accountable), Police Brutality, Constant Intrusion and Surveillance (Domain Awareness System, (DAS) created by the NYPD in partnership with Microsoft),  Numbers Game of their Quotas (against minorities for minor offenses, tickets, small amounts of drug), Cover-Ups (The Blue Shield of Silence), botched or destroyed various pieces of evidence throughout investigations…

Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s ‘private army’ has been increasingly unleashed to beat, arrest, imprison, and broadly suppress OWS, targeted arrests of specific organizers as well as random street ‘snatch and release’ intimidation tactics.

They’re dangerous, and they’re mad. Somebody please stop them.

~The Stranger
thestranger@earthling.net

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Outmoded Cogs

All those outmoded pieces of the political machine stand in the way between our current miserable lot and real progress. That’s right, brand them for it! Make the reactionaries wear their conservative moniker for the shame that it is!

PLAYLIST
Peer Gynt Suite ‘In the Hall of the Mountain King’
The Supernatural Anaesthetist – Genesis
Symphonic Fantasia No.1 & 2 – Akira Ifukube
Evil Devolution – Ayreon
Loving – Astor Piazzolla, Kronos Quartet
Fight Outta You – Ben Harper
The Needle Has Landed – Neko Case
Butcher’s Boy – Damien Jurado
Miracula Eternitatis – Cirque Du Soleil
Wander – The Album Leaf
Spanish Castles in Space – The Orb
Boredom – Procol Harum
Music for a Found Harmonium – Penguin Cafe Orchestra
Gentler We – Clogs
Magnificat – Manuel Cardoso
Kentucky Moonshiner – Dave Van Ronk
Yesterday Is Here – Tom Waits

Archaic thinking, smirking opportunistic politicians, violent religious extremists, right-wing mainstream media, forcing teachers to strike, and the digital disruption of your privacy threaten us daily. Sadly, the show is only weekly, and we do what we can.

~The Stranger
thestranger@earthling.net

Under the Influence

The world is going out of it’s damn mind. We’ll let the music explore each fucked up mindset, as we fall under the influence of politics, madness, intoxicants, and (as always) lack of sleep.

A mind is a wonderful to waste.

PLAYLIST
Hall Of The Mountain King – Self Diagnosis
Blinded By The Light – Manfred Mann’s Earth Band
Morning Meditation – Ali Akbar Khan
I’m So Tired – The Beatles
Sunday Morning Coming Down – Johnny Cash
Lost in the Ozone – Commander Cody
Just Dropped In (To See What Condition My Condition Was In) – Kenny Rogers & The First Edition
The Transmigration of Hop Heads – Acid Mothers Temple & the Melting Paraiso U.F.O.
Reclaim Your Mind – Cosmic Gnostic and the Astral Travelers
Becoming Insane – Infected Mushroom
Anxiety – Astor Piazzolla and the Kronos Quartet
Where Is My Mind – The Pixies
Think I Lost My Headache – Queens of the Stone Age
I Almost Lost My Mind – Zalman Yanovsky
Stoned Guitar – Human Instinct
Stairway To Heaven – London Philharmonic Orchestra
7 Days Drunk – The Adventures Of Robert Savage
Slow Down – Ozzy Osbourne
Comfortably Numb – Pink Floyd
Drinking – They Might Be Giants
I’d Rather Have a Bottle in Front of Me (Than a Frontal Lobotomy) – Randy Hanzlick
They’re Coming To Take Me Away! – Napoleon XIV

Mitt Romney this week showed what a great world leader he would be by insulting our greatest allies, inflaming tensions in the Middle East and desecrating holy ground. His travels, however, were not in vain. He was able to pander to a religious population (Jews, but really the evangelical Christians at home) with his meritocratic clout and raise money from the LIBOR-scammer elites by promising even more deregulation!

“I’d like to get rid of Dodd Frank” ~Mitt Money Romney

Romney hailed the Israel’s health care system for holding down costs and broadening coverage more effectively than the U.S., though Israel contains costs by adopting a very centralized, government-run health care system that conservatives in this country equate with European-style socialism.

One of his top advisors also caused a stir by seeming to say that Romney would back an Israeli strike against Iran, but they seemed to realize that tough talk does not equal foreign policy credibility. His real gaffe was in implying that the downtrodden Palestinian people have chosen to be there, or that their “culture” proves that they deserve to be under the boot-heels of the Israelis.

Mitt Romney boldly declared that Israel’s economic superiority over the Palestinians was due to its culture… which seemed to imply that he believes that Palestinians are just sort of naturally inclined to live under military occupation. (This didn’t seem to bug that many Israelis, even though it does suggest that he believes they are … innately good with money, let’s say.)

Romney believes, in other words, that Palestinians just don’t value freedom enough to get it for themselves. The territory is under a decades-long military occupation and residents face restrictions on movement and trade.

“During my recent trip to Israel, I had suggested that the choices a society makes about its culture play a role in creating prosperity, and that the significant disparity between Israeli and Palestinian living standards was powerfully influenced by it,” Romney wrote in the National Review. “In some quarters, that comment became the subject of controversy. But what exactly accounts for prosperity if not culture?

He directly compared the per capita GDP of Israel and the Palestinian territories and attributed Israel’s comparative strength to “culture” and the “hand of providence.” He implied that the Palestinian territories are socialist, which isn’t true, and a quick look at wikipedia shows that their economy was growing by leaps and bounds between the 60’s and 80’s, and has been slowing with the West Bank occupation and oppression, Israeli “security measures” and rising unemployment (surely a ‘choice’ as it is here in America).

“I have just returned from a trip abroad. I visited three lands — Israel, Poland, and Great Britain — which are defined by their respective struggles for freedom. I met with some of the greatest heroes of those struggles.”

“I realize that there will be some in the Fourth Estate, or whichever estate, who are far more interested in finding something to write about that is unrelated to the economy, to geopolitics, to the threat of war, to the reality of conflict in Afghanistan today, to a nuclearization of Iran,” Romney said.

But the radicalization of right-wing America is only going to hurt Romney, and others, in the long run. Gingrich was successful in ousting many moderates in the 90’s, but many old and new are leaving in disgust, or sticking around just to badmouth the extremism rife in their own party.

“For a long time, words like ‘compromise’ have been like dirty words. I always believed that the art of being a legislator is finding common ground.” ~Republican Ohio Rep. Steve LaTourette 

But speaking of compromise, it takes many Democrats as well as Republicans to push through the Bush tax rate on those making more than $200,000 annually.

  • Jason Altmire (Pennsylvania)
  • John Barrow (Georgia)
  • Dan Boren (Oklahoma)
  • Ben Chandler (Kentucky)
  • Jim Cooper (Tennessee)
  • Jim Costa (California)
  • Henry Cuellar (Texas)
  • Joe Donnelly (Indiana)
  • Larry Kissell (North Carolina)
  • Jim Matheson (Utah)
  • Mike McIntyre (North Carolina)
  • Jerry McNerney (California)
  • Bill Owens (New York)
  • Collin Peterson (Minnesota)
  • Mike Ross (Arkansas)
  • Kurt Schrader (Oregon)
  • Heath Shuler (North Carolina)
  • Mike Thompson (California)
  • Tim Walz (Minnesota)

When it comes to taxes, we may see an unfair tax code get even worse. This is far more important issue than whether Mitt Romney paid his taxes, or other secrets from his returns. His tax plan would be a boon for the wealthy, but a tax hike for 95% of Americans, according to a new nonpartisan study by the Tax Policy Center, a joint project of the Urban Institute and Brookings Institution.

And though the Romney team have called the group a bunch of liberals (they hailed them in the past as “objective, third-party analysis” when the findings benefitted them), he couldn’t dispel any of their specific claims. Even more damning for himself is the revenue neutrality, or Romney’s own non-commitment to specifying the tax loopholes or breaks he’d close, probably because he wouldn’t close any (he has suggested that he would only look to breaks that benefit the wealthy).

“Even if tax expenditures are eliminated in a way designed to make the resulting tax system as progressive as possible, there would still be a shift in the tax burden of roughly $86 billion from those making over $200,000 to those making less than that amount,” the report reads.

“Americans making over $1 million would see an increase in after-tax income of 4.1 percent (an $87,000 tax cut), those making between $500,000 and $1 million would see an increase of 3.2 percent (a $17,000 tax cut), and those making between $200,000 and $500,000 would see an increase of 0.8 percent (a $1,800 tax cut).”

As for the other 95% of Americans? Not so much. The average tax increase needed to pay for the elite’s gains would be $500 per household.

Obama was quick to jump on this opportunity (the opportunistic bastard):

“He’s not asking you to contribute more to pay down the deficit, he’s not asking you to pay more to invest in our children’s education or rebuild our roads or put more folks back to work,” Obama said. “He’s asking you to pay more so that people like him can get a big tax cut.”

Romney claimed that the report is “biased” as it fails to take into account the explosion of economic growth that would theoretically occur in the future under a potential Romney’s administration.

Apparently anticipating this criticism, the Tax Policy Center decided to humor them by including an alternate (reality) analysis in its study in which it assumed that Romney turns out to be correct and his tax proposals produce unexpected floods of new revenue. However, even that generous concession didn’t change its analysis.

“Although reasonable models would show that these tax changes would have little effect on growth, we show that even with implausibly large growth effects, revenue neutrality would still require large reductions in tax expenditures and would likely result in a net tax increase for lower- and middle-income households and tax cuts for high-income households,” the study concluded.

In other words: How will he PAY for these cuts!? Perhaps Romney would be a good little engine of the economy and make up the difference out of his own offshore accounts.

As the richest of the rich, or .001%, or fewer than 10 million people, have used secret tax shelters around the world to hide anywhere from $21-32 trillion, or more, since they shutter around various accounts and are nigh-untrackable (according to the Tax Justice Network). An amount equal to the US and Japanese economies.

At a low 3%, this is anywhere between $190-250 billion in tax revenue —which is about twice the amount OECD countries spend on development assistance. That’s just income taxes. Capital gains taxes, inheritance taxes, and other taxes would bring in even more.

In order to save a few bucks on taxes, they essentially put themselves in the same category as copyright trolls and drug lords. They hide funds in the Cayman Islands, Singapore, Switzerland, as well as “virtual” havens, “nominal, hyper-portable, multi-jurisdictional, often quite temporary locations of networks of legal and quasi-legal entities and arrangements” facilitated by too-big-to-fail Goldman Sachs, UBS, and Credit Suisse (the top three), with Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and JP Morgan Chase all in the top ten of “key enablers of the global tax injustice system.”

The lost tax revenue from offshore tax shelters, they note, “is large enough to make a significant difference to all of our conventional measures of inequality. Since most of the missing financial wealth belongs to a tiny elite, the impact is staggering.”

Many Americans are already misinformed about our level of inequality—but this report confirms that even supposed experts were wildly underestimating the problem. The developing world, for example, has $4 trillion in debt, but their own elites have stores $10 trillion offshore. “That means this is really a tax justice problem, not simply a ‘debt’ problem.” Those debts fall on the shoulders of the everyday working people of those countries, those who can’t take advantage of sophisticated tax shelters.

Of course, this is merely yet another lie spun by the conservative media:

  1. Higher taxes on the rich will hurt small businesses and discourage job creators

A recent Treasury analysis found that only  2.5% of small businesses  would face higher taxes from the expiration of the Bush tax cuts.

Over 90% of the assets owned by millionaires are held in a combination of low-risk investments (bonds and cash), the stock market, real estate, and personal business accounts Angel investing (capital provided by affluent individuals for business start-ups) accounted for less than 1% of the investable assets  of high net worth individuals in North America in 2011.  The Mendelsohn Affluent Survey  agreed that the very rich spend less than two percent of their money on new business startups.

Even the Wall Street Journal noted that the extra wealth created by the Bush tax cuts led to the “worst track record for jobs in recorded history.”

2. Individual initiative is all you need for success.

If anything, it’s harder than ever today to ascend through the ranks on one’s own. As summarized in the  Pew research report  “Pursuing the American Dream,” only 4% of those starting out in the bottom quintile make it to the top quintile as adults

3. A booming stock market is good for all of us

But as the market rises, most Americans are getting a smaller slice of the pie. But the richest 10% of Americans  own over 80%  of the stock market. Thanks in good part to a meager 15% capital gains tax, the  richest 400 taxpayers DOUBLED their income and nearly HALVED their tax rates in just seven years (2001-2007). And the stock market scamming grows faster than our GDP.

The truth has a nasty habit of coming to the surface, as the Koch brothers-funded climate scientist Richard Muller discovered:

“Last year, following an intensive research effort involving a dozen scientists, I concluded that global warming was real and that the prior estimates of the rate of warming were correct. I’m now going a step further: Humans are almost entirely the cause.”

“Our results show that the average temperature of the earth’s land has risen by two and a half degrees Fahrenheit over the past 250 years, including an increase of one and a half degrees over the most recent 50 years. Moreover, it appears likely that essentially all of this increase results from the human emission of greenhouse gases. Our record is long enough that we could search for the fingerprint of solar variability, based on the historical record of sunspots. That fingerprint is absent.”

“The carbon dioxide curve gives a better match than anything else we’ve tried. Its magnitude is consistent with the calculated greenhouse effect — extra warming from trapped heat radiation. These facts don’t prove causality and they shouldn’t end skepticism, but they raise the bar: to be considered seriously, an alternative explanation must match the data at least as well as carbon dioxide does.”

But good old-fashioned fear-mongering always seems to work. The FBI cast anarchists and activists as terrorists and criminals, even as they violate their constitutional due process by targeting them based on politics *ahem* “criminal evidence” such as black clothing, anarchist literature, and placard signs, flags and… flag-making materials. Essentially, a fishing expedition.

“It’s related to political opposition, it’s related to political dissent,” says Dennison Williams. “They’re trying to create a wedge within people who are resistors… They’re specifically pursuing anarchists.”

Political supporters calling themselves the “Committee Against Political Repression” have already set up a website to post information about the case and take donations to the legal fund: NoPoliticalRepression.wordpress.com with a “solidarity statement” from numerous activist groups condemning the “series of coordinated raids.”

Likewise, we should FEAR the cybercrime which costs us $1 trillion a year, according to Gen. Keith Alexander, director of the National Security Agency and oversees U.S. Cyber Command, which is causing “the greatest transfer of wealth in history.” He must not have read the other articles that we have.

But the source of his numbers remains a mystery. The trillion-dollar estimate was first published in a news release that McAfee issued to announce the report; the number does not appear in the report itself.

McAfee’s trillion-dollar estimate is questioned even by the three independent researchers from Purdue University whom McAfee credits with analyzing the raw data from which the estimate was derived. “I was really kind of appalled when the number came out in news reports, the trillion dollars, because that was just way, way large,” said Eugene Spafford, a computer science professor at Purdue.

Of the 17 other researchers and contributors, Ross Anderson, a security engineering professor at University of Cambridge, said that he did not know about the $1 trillion estimate before it was announced. “I would have objected at the time had I known about it,” he said. “The intellectual quality of this ($1 trillion number) is below abysmal.”

When asked about the reporting, politicians simply repeat the number as if it were gospel. Then again, lawmakers don’t know shit. They don’t even know what the fuck all those drones are doing up there. The NYPD is going to start tracking and surveilling people all over the city with help from Microsoft as part of their “domestic awareness system”. The FBI will be ramping up their Next Generation Identification (NGI) Facial Recognition Program in 2014, containing at least 12 million “searchable frontal photos.”

“Facial recognition takes the risks inherent in other biometrics to a new level . . . [it] allows for covert, remote, and mass capture and identification of images, and the photos that may end up in a database include not just a person’s face but also what she is wearing, what she might be carrying, and who she is associated with.” ~EFF testimony at the Senate Subcommittee hearing on facial recognition

All this authoritarian technology is frightening enough, but even if we manage to stave off the worst implications of a technological takeover, we still face existential threats to our identity, autonomy, anonymity and individuality as we enmesh and embed with out digital devices.

Stranger in a Strange Land 2012-08-04: Under the Influence by The Stranger onMixcloud

~The Stranger
thestranger@earthling.net

Fusion

Tonight a fusion of world events, geopolitics and international genres!

PLAYLIST
In The Hall Of The Mountain King – The Marimba Belles
So What – Miles Davis (Miles From India Tribute)
The Shadow World – Sun Ra
A Minha Menina -Os Mutantes
Zana – Toquinho
Call Any Vegetable Suite -Frank Zappa & The Mothers
This Is An Artistic Statement (Part I) – The Beat Of The Earth
Love Is Like A Bottle Of Gin – The Magnetic Fields
Chilly Winds Don’t Blow – Nina Simone
Everything – Radio Citizen feat. Bajka
Sax Quartet – Seatbelts
Star Vader – Guitar Vader
Jardin Chinois – Cirque Du Soleil
La Petite Fille de la Mer – Vangelis
Storm – Parov Stelar
In-Flux – DJ Shadow
The Lighthouse – Amon Tobin
Scratch Bass – Lamb
Track 24 – Z-Trip
A Sunday Mystery – RjD2
Midnight Lullaby – Tom Waits
Niltrous Burn Out 2012 – Man… Or Astroman?

Many Republicans who voted for contempt against Eric Holder in his ‘Fast and the Furious’ operation, subscribe to a conspiracy theory holding that the administration tried to boost the number of weapons going to Mexico in order to increase support for gun regulations that have never been introduced.

This does not make sense.

Aside from the fact that Mr. Holder had no direct influence over the operation (something that he could, theoretically, actually be criticized for by sane individuals), President Obama hasn’t so much as breathed a word of gun control speak in the general direction of the ten-foot pole not even touching the issue. But then again, these are the same reactionary citizens who have no problem bordering on treasonous remarks when it benefits their fancy little Tea Party.

“To resist by all means that are right in the eyes of God is not rebellion or insurrection, it is patriotic resistance to invasion.”

-Roy Nicholson, Chairman of the Mississippi Tea Party

In light of the open suggestions of armed revolt, Glenn Greenwald at Salon wonders:

Does President Obama have the power to order Nicholson assassinated without charges or trial? Should he have this right? What’s the principled distinction that makes assassinating Awlaki acceptable but not Nicholson? The most likely answer is that Awlaki was in Yemen while Nicholson is in the U.S., but that’s just a pragmatic difference, one that cannot make any legal or Constitutional difference: American citizens don’t renounce their Constitutional protections against the U.S. Government when they leave the country. If the President has the legal authority to assassinate U.S. citizens without charges on the ground that they are allegedly plotting against the U.S. when they’re on foreign soil, then shouldn’t the President have this same right for citizens on American soil? Think Progress celebrates the Awlaki assassination as an Obama “success”; would they do the same if the President ordered Nicholson assassinated without charges?

I could, in the ‘I’m Rubber-You’re-Glue’ vein, introduce some conspiracies of my own… Such as the theory that Mitt Romney is covering up federal felonies related to his contradicting claims made to SEC officials. Romney owned a Bermuda-based company for over 15 years which suggests that without further disclosure it may be impossible to tell his actual hidden wealth. Or point out how Bain Capital to invest in a medical-waste disposal company that disposed of aborted fetuses. And:

“In 1991, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration cited its Arkansas operation for 11 workplace safety violations. The facility had not provided employees with sufficient protective gear, and it had kept body parts, fetuses, and dead experimental animals in unmarked storage containers, placing workers at risk.

And though Romney and others are making this merely a “referendum on Obama”, and spreading lies about the tax impact of his healthcare plan, when you compare the projected revenue effect of the individual mandate to the actual revenue effects of other, actually large tax increases, their claims becomeslaughable. The mandate is tiny by comparison.

And most American’s actually support the provisions in ‘Obamacare’:

A recent poll by the Kaiser Family Foundation found Americans split down the middle, with 41 percent approving of the law, and 40 percent saying they didn’t like it. But then Kaiser asked about 12 specific provisions in the legislation, and found that, on average, 63 percent of respondents approved of the nuts and bolts of Obamacare. Of the 12 measures they tested, only one – the controversial mandate to carry health insurance or pay a penalty – received the approval of less than half of Americans (35 percent).

Or consider this divide: while only 12 percent of Republicans had a positive view of the law overall, 47 percent, on average, viewed its specifics favorably.

What most folks don’t know about the law (or have been outright lied to), is that most Americans will be getting subsidy checks, including tax credits for small businesses that offer employee coverage, advanceable tax credits for citizens, the richest Americans paying a fair amount that they can comfortably afford, insurers actually required to spend money on their customers, and larger companies (with 50 or more full-time workers) will have to pay penalties if they don’t provide coverage.

According to the Congressional Budget Office, just 1 percent of the population will pay the mandate penalty, which maxes out at 1 percent of one’s income, and the law will reduce the projected deficit by $210 billion over the next decade.

The bill provides maternity care, mental healthcare and substance abuse treatment, pediatric care, ambulance rides and hospitalization, and new dollars for community health centers.

Yes, the old systems are starting to decay, and will all hopefully be replaced with reasonable solutions. As Chris Hedges writes at Truthdig:

“Civilizations in the final stages of decay are dominated by elites out of touch with reality. … This failure to impose limits cannibalizes natural resources and human communities. This time, the difference is that when we go the whole planet will go with us.”

The Rockerfellers and the Rothschilds are merging their interests, as are the Koch Brothers and Casino mogul Sheldon Adelsonpledging $10 million to their conservative 2012 efforts. And even those that take the fall for massive investment failures and fraud (covering for the super-rich elites) face no jail time and will not have any money clawed back.

This is the most important rule of finance: It really doesn’t matter how badly you screw up; if you’re an important enough person you will never face any real negative consequences, besides a bit of bad press. The best managers know how to delegate large-scale theft and fraud.

So even though Barclay’s has agreed to pay fines related to their price-fixing scamwe won’t be seeing any of that money. There were also huge bid-rigging settlements for Chase, UBS, Bank of America, GE and Wachovia.

Our only slim hope is that they’ll take themselves out, though this is grisly and unjust. Is the 1% going to leap at this as an example of their first casualty in the Class War we nefarious “poors” are waging against them?

Corporate profits are at an all-time high; wages (as a percent of the economy) are at an all-time low, often at or just above the poverty level.

“One reason companies are so profitable is that they’re paying employees less than they ever have as a share of GDP. And that, in turn, is one reason the economy is so weak: Those ‘wages’ are other companies’ revenue,” Henry Blodget, Business Insider. And high unemployment makes workers willing to accept those poverty wages.

Right-wingers from Michele Bachmann to Ron Paul have used high unemployment as an opportunity to call for eliminating the minimum wage entirely, letting companies decide just how little they think their workers are worth. Companies love to claim that if they’re forced to pay more, they’ll have to eliminate jobs, but these numbers show that actually, they’re able to keep wages low and refuse to hire, And the rich are getting ever richer.

Politicians proclaim that they feel your pain while announcing budget cuts that freeze salaries, lay off workers and force more work onto those who remain. CEOs use that same language when explaining why they simply can’t create jobs. Morgan Stanley’s CEO, James Gorman blamed the lousy economy when asked why he hadn’t created the jobs his company had promised the city in exchange for massive tax breaks.

That’s what rich corporations are able to buy with their record profits: politicians who turn around and hand them even more money, in the form of tax breaks that hollow out city and state budgets and force even more austerity and even more social service cuts that fall on the backs of the same underpaid workers.

Corporate taxes are at a 40-year low, with an effective tax rate paid of 12.1 percent. That’s what you can buy when you’d rather pay politicians than your workers.

The Center for American Progress found in a study that as union membership decreases, so does the so-called middle class’s share of national income. The middle class has long served as a buffer between those at the top and those at the bottom. As long as the majority of Americans were comfortable, had decent jobs and pensions, and could send their kids to school, the wealthy could stay wealthy and the poor were pretty much just ignored. And that middle class was built through decades of union agitation, not just for higher wages and health care benefits, but for the eight-hour day, for the weekend, and for safety in the workplace and some job security.

But now the middle class has been hollowed out, many of their jobs being outsourced or automated into nonexistence in the name of profits. Increasingly, there are the super-super-rich, and there are the rest of us.

The far right frames these issues as moral ones, and so should we.

The basic idea behind democracy in America is the idea that citizens care about each other; that they act socially as well as individually to cash out that care, and they try to do as well as they can in doing that both for themselves and for others. They do this by having the government create what we call “the public.” The public provision of things; things for everybody – roads, bridges, sewers, public education and public health, like the Centers for Disease Control. Clean air, clean water, the provision of energy, communications and so on. These are all the sorts of things that you can’t live a life without. A private life or a private enterprise. Every business depends on all of these things. The private depends on the public. That is a moral issue. That is how we care about each other.

Now many are claiming that the toxic economic philosophy of austerity for the poor, deregulated greed and risk-taking for the rich, and blind obedience to authoritarianism, has become it’s own religion (and a very anti-Christian one at that).

“Anyone who believes in indefinite growth in anything physical, on a physically finite planet, is either mad – or an economist.” ~Kenneth Boulding

“Neoclassical economics has become a religion. Because it has a mathematical veneer, and I emphasize the word veneer, they actually believe it’s true. Once you believe something is true, you’re locked into its way of thinking unless there’s something that can break in from the outside and destroy that confidence.” ~Economics professor Steve Keen

“The arguments of economists legitimate social and economic arrangements by providing these arrangements with quasi-religious justification. Economists are thus doing theology while for the most part unaware of that fact.” ~Paul Heyne

Paul Krugman also has some very reasonable choice words on the virtue of selfishness.

But the systems of power continue to peddle and perpetuate their scam of ‘hard work in America.’

Since the 1970s, America’s annual working hours have been steadily increasing. At the same time, middle-class wages have stagnated or declined. Despite this, Americans work more hours than any other Western nation, says Boston University professor Ellen Shell. , and this is bad for the economy and bad for our mental and physical well-being. “…we must push hard against our current practice of celebrating overwork and treat it as the scam it has become,” she says, referring to how the wages of the upper-class have boomed in the last decade.

We’re headed back to the robber baron era, the Gilded Age, and in many ways may already be there.

We have the highest level of income inequality in 90 years, both private and public sector unions are under a concerted attack, and federal and state governments intend to cut deficits by slashing services to the poor. Unregulated corporate greed has historically created economic collapses that the public then has to pay for. Unions are being stamped out, elections are being openly bought and sold, the Supreme Court is heavily partisan towards the financial industry, civil liberties are being violated and protestors shot, votes are being discounted, and minority groups beaten and subjugated.

NYPD is now operating in cahoots with the CIA, using its resources as a vast domestic spy network engaged in surveillance, mapping and infiltration,  stretching from the heart of New York City to the border of Canada—by way of Connecticut, New Jersey and Long Island. Treating basic acts of daily living as potential crimes, disregarding privacy and the freedom of speech and religion. Mild-mannered Muslim citizens, students, cab drivers, business owners, vendros are all fair game, with every minute detail of their lives being recorded. How long before the eyes of scrutiny are turned on the rest of us?

There’s a rich history in this country of suppressing dissent and stripping away civil rights; the WWI Red Scare and “Prostitution” roundups, the Depression-era Bonus Army attack, WWII internment, and most notably, the surveillance and operations against left-leaning political groups in the 1960s (COINTELPRO) and the lawless indefinite detention post 9/11 to today. Anarchists, communists, labor organizers, civil rights organizations and various ethnic groups were all monitored by a succession of “Red Squads.”

Mass arrests accompanied the Republican conventions held in New York in 2004, when 900 people were busted, and in St. Paul in 2008 when 300 were detained, including 30 journalists. In the recent NATO summit held in Chicago at which approximately 70 people were busted over two days, including three for “terrorism.”

Increasingly, steps are being taken to prevent us from making real change.

What’s needed, for starters, is a unified progressive identity, a concerted effort to institutionalize coordination, a common infrastructure capable of formulating clear policy objectives and strategic messages, and a commitment to creating a powerful, unified movement beyond isolated campaigns. a new American Dream, a New Progressive Movement.

“America needs a different story. . . . So let me say what I think up front: The leaders and thinkers and activists who honestly tell that story and speak passionately of the moral and religious values it puts in play will be the first political generation since the New Deal to win power back for the people.”

~Bill Moyers

We need ideas for dethroning GDP, transcending consumerism, transforming corporations, revitalizing communities, building a different system for money and finance, and more.

Yes Magazine illustrates a vision of America the possible, a manifesto on the “new economy.” The following transformations hold the key to moving to a new political economy. Consider each as a transition from today to tomorrow.

  • Economic growth: from growth fetish to post-growth society, from mere GDP growth to growth in human welfare and democratically determined priorities.
  • The market: from near laissez-faire to powerful market governance in the public interest.
  • The corporation: from shareholder primacy to stakeholder primacy, from one ownership and motivation model to new business models and the democratization of capital.
  • Money and finance: from Wall Street to Main Street, from money created through bank debt to money created by government.
  • Social conditions: from economic insecurity to security, from vast inequities to fundamental fairness.
    Indicators: from GDP (“grossly distorted picture”) to accurate measures of social and environmental health and quality of life.
  • Consumerism: from consumerism and affluenza to sufficiency and mindful consumption, from more to enough.
  • Communities: from runaway enterprise and throwaway communities to vital local economies, from social rootlessness to rootedness and solidarity.
  • Dominant cultural values: from having to being, from getting to giving, from richer to better, from separate to connected, from apart from nature to part of nature, from transcendent to interdependent, from today to tomorrow.
  • Politics: from weak democracy to strong, from creeping corporatocracy and plutocracy to true popular sovereignty.
  • Foreign policy and the military: from American exceptionalism to America as a normal nation, from hard power to soft, from military prowess to real security.

There’s work to be done together. But there’s democracy in the air.

Stranger in a Strange Land 2012-07-07: Fusion by The Stranger on Mixcloud

~The Stranger
thestranger@earthling.net

Awesome Source

If anyone were to ask me (they never do) what sort of sources I use on the internet as News Director for Mutiny Radio, for my own show The Stranger in a Strangeland, or just as a web surfer, blogger, podcaster or podcast-listener, I wouldn’t have had a list readily available. Modern technology, however, would allow me to whip up an answer in the form of the feed aggregators on Google Reader, Blogger and iTunes. All the same, I thought I’d have a “little” entry prepared with some words about each and why I use/enjoy them, should anyone become inquisitive in the future, or for posterity.

News Sites/Aggregators

Generally, I have a preponderance of news waiting for me to skim in my Google Reader each morning. This includes the wealth of information from the New York Times, BBC, Euronews, Al-Jazeera and Russia Today (RT), all of whom I trust to varying degrees to deliver a broad picture of what the world looks like at the moment. I typically do not trust the NYT’s coverage of Iran (or hardly any American sources for that matter), but agencies like Al-Jazeera, RT and the Conflict Monitors of the Human Security Report Project are usually reliable for producing a look at international issues from every side. Talking Points Memo (TPM) showcases what would be considered the progressive side of the news, but often without comment, with links to entire quotes and context, and a diligent job of muckraking. Their charts and analysis are great fodder for any news feed.

To get at the real heart of matters, however, we want journalists and researchers who will more deeply cover the stories than the national conversation would normally dictate or allow. Intrepid newmen and editors from Alternet, Truth-out, Democracy Now! and the Real News Network provide hard-hitting watchdog journalism, and pose incisive questions to power. Salon is a refreshingly progressive source of news, comment, and blogs written by the likes of Glenn Greenwald and Mary Elizabeth Williams, and Truth Dig, which features progressive columnist Chris Hedges. The Young Turks with Cenk Uygur is perhaps the greatest news resource on the internet or anywhere if you want to escape the drudgery of big corporate-driven conservative media.

Regardless of politics, I choose not to read the Huffington Post due to their abysmal science reporting. Without a good sense of the scientific method, I cannot trust their standards for journalism.

For science news, there are more resources than time to read in a day, with my inbox overflowing more in this category than any other, a reminder of the rapidly developing times we live in. New Scientist (both the magazine and the site) and Physorg provide a constant stream of scientific discovery, with timely technorati Ars Technica and WIRED revealing where the state of technological advancement has us (WIRED recently broke the story of the NSA’s mega-base in the Utah desert). The Electronic Frontier Foundation combines civil libertarian advocacy work and news with parsing large amounts of technical and legal information, “defending our rights in a digital world.”

For an alternative view, Disinformation aggregates strange and conspiratorial stories from around the web, defiant of the Big Brother states that allows their continued existence.. for now.

Whereas sites like Laughing Squid, Flavorpill and Neatorama offer up pop cultural items, mashups, fun topics and much needed escapism, in other words, all things neat-o. Neat facts, and topics can be had at Mental Floss and life’s big questions at Soul Pancake (co-created by Rainn Wilson). Gizmodo’s (itself a tech news giant) sister-site io9 (as well as Syfy’s own Blastr) keeps us at the cutting edge of science-fiction, which of course could be light years ahead of science fact reporting, or as their tagline boasts “We come from the future.” Whereas Lifehacker helps you get your shit together with easy, simple fixes, showcasing shortcuts to life’s tedium.

And just as general resources go, you’ll find that Snopes has been the greatest defender against internet and urban legend chicanery for years, and that the TV Tropes wiki will help you understand how fiction, culture and memetics works a whole let better. You won’t believe they actually have names for some of these things!

Podcasts

The Skeptic’s Guide to the Universe is hosted by Steve Novella, neurologist, professor, president and co-founder of the New England Skeptical Society, with his panel of skeptical rogues, brothers Bob and Jay Novella, Rebecca Watson and Evan Burnstein. The interesting science topics, audio games and quirks, in-depth interviews, numerous sci-fi references, and of course the irreverent, conversational and casual wit of the skeptics makes it a welcome treat on my ipod each week. These usually go over an hour, but I consistently find myself wanting more.

Brian Dunning’s Skeptoid are a much smaller, so if you want your dose of critical thinking in a fifteen minute dose, enjoy his cool presentation of the self-researched topics ranging from Bigfoot to the Denver Airport. Now over his 300th episode, he somehow manages to uncover a seemingly endless array of new and intriguing myths, legends and misinformation.

Big Picture Science (formerly Are We Alone?) is hosted by Seth Shostak and Molly Bentley of the SETI (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence) Institute. With the big picture question of ‘Are We Alone’, the goofy gang of serious scientists have springboarded into the world of the atom, the future, the cell, the virus, the planets, the brain, and any other area where an inquisitive microphone can go. Ideation of this magnitude can also be found by watching Dr. Michio Kaku expound on science’s great questions on Explorations in Science.

Neuropod, hosted by neurogeek Kerri Smith, comes out once a month (with a few bonus episodes here and there), to fill you in on some of the latest discoveries in the world of Neuroscience. Not all of the aspects catch my interest, but the ones that do really do. And since it isn’t as prolific as some of the others, and the information not as time-sensitive, I can enjoy it at any pace without them piling up.

Two more that have been around for a while but I am just now beginning to check out and delve into are the BBC Radio 4’s The Life Scientific and the backlog of wonderful TED Talks (both audio and video).

Though I am now well-planted in the firm reality of scientific discovery, a nostalgic craving, sense of zany fun, and a smirking incredulity keep me coming back to Coast to Coast AM hosted by George Noory, with John B. Wells, George Knapp and Ian Punnett playing weekends and backup. I have been hooked on this show (along with many other listeners, of which there are now estimated 4.5 million listeners every night, making it the most listened to late night show in North America) since the mid-to-late-90’s, when Art Bell‘s grizzled tones would part the airwaves to spook us with the most arcane topics. Today’s shows are sometimes less esoteric, and the format is more formalized, but George Noory is absolutely charming in his innocent and nonjudgemental inclusion of a wide variety of topics in the realms of politics, conspiracy, the paranormal or speculations on the future.

The Psychedelic Salon with Lorenzo features lectures from some of the world’s strangest and deepest thinkers, such as Timothy Leary, Robert Anton Wilson, Albert Hoffmann, Alexander Shulgin, and of course the inimitable Terence McKenna. I must admit that I skip some shows that do not feature McKenna’s brilliant form of rhetorical styling and intellectual mastery. Of late, however, I keep coming back for Lorenzo’s faithful coverage of the Occupy movement, and related audio, which I sometimes use on my own show. Another fun nugget of mind-body awakening can be found in the Alan Watts Podcast, rebroadcasting short philosophical bites from the Alan Watts Library.

The Philosopher’s Zone with Alan Saunders, whose received pronunciation may at first seem strange on Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) Radio National, nonetheless perfectly mixes deep, philosophical questions with silly, simple ones. Part history lesson, part mind expansion, don’t allow your own life to go unexamined without at least inspecting some of the introspections bound to arise while listening!

Similarly, philosopher Tim O’Connor‘s Conversations from the Pale Blue Dot (taken from a Carl Sagan line), raises startling, tortuous questions about God, self, reality and being with atheists, agnostics, deists, and religious scholars of every faith. The show aims to “take philosophy to the street, illustrating how conversation… can be carried out in a careful, civil, and constructive way by people who disagree.”

When I first started listening to The History of Rome, I thought I would listen through the reign of Augustus or perhaps Claudius and then get bored. Here we are near the beginning of the Dark Ages, and I’m still hanging on to Mike Duncan’s carefully researched and recited dissertation on the storied lives, politics, drama, battles and intrigue (with a little cheesy humor thrown in at times) of Rome’s expansive civilization. To jump around in time, the adorable and well-read Deblina Chakraborty and Sarah Dowdey present Stuff You Missed in History Class from HowStuffWorks.com. Thrilling and yet sometimes obscure historical stories, often examining a subject from as many angles as possible, revealing personal stories from time in the process, heartbreaking, brave, humorous and epic.

The International Spy Museum SpyCast is a great bit of history and political science education if you’re into the worlds of espionage, military history (and present), and the skullduggery of terrorists and intelligentsia alike.

Even the hilarious and conversational entertainment programming I subscribe to, Kevin Smith and Scott Mosier’s Smodcast and Ricky Gervais‘ podcast with Steven Merchant and Harvey Pilkington, present a sort of primer on critical thinking. Often revealing stories of science, religion, and history in the same casual manner as pop culture or scatalogical humor, the more skeptical Mosier often guides Kevin gently through the scientific method, whereas Ricky and Steve will taunt and ridicule Harvey’s mistaken notions of how the world works, ultimate culminating in an Idiot Abroad. Two different examples for how friends interact, and two different methods for how skeptics or atheists can talk to believers, and either way, all in good fun. The Onion adds another satirical bit of aural pleasure to your inbox, giving you some sensationally fraudulent talking points for the week.

And finally, X Minus One (X-1) has been my constant ipod companion since my first Nano. Classic tales of science fiction and horror from the 1950’s and 1960’s, the same spine-tingling diversions into space and time that probably elated my father when he was a boy.

Blogs

The frequently updated blogs on WIRED are some of my favorites, and I think I’ve been following them the longest, as they equally rate with other news in my feed. Epicenter, which puts the reader in the heart of the constantly changing world of digital media industries and business. Writers like Kim Zetter and David Kravets present absolutely essential information on Danger Room, closely following military gadgetry and national security, or Threat Level which, like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, highlights the latest threats to our privacy, individual freedoms or civil liberties pertaining to technology and surveillance.

Nick Bilton, tech blogger for the New York Times’ Bits, is also the author of I Come From the Future and This is How it Works, a stunning analysis of how the shifting media and technology landscape is affecting industries, our culture, and our brains. As a blogger he is adept at finding and focusing in on lesser talked about yet important issues in technology, often raising stirring points about the trends and transactions.

Michael Anissimov (who was interviewed on the Strangeland) is media director for the Singularity Institute and co-organizer of the Singularity Summit. He is co-founder of the Lifeboat Foundation, which seeks to find safe and responsible developments for emerging technologies. His blog, Accelerating Future, bring our minds closer to the future of nanotechnology, biotechnology, robotics, transhumanism, Artificial Intelligence, the Singularity, and extinction risk.

Harvey Silverglate (another former guest), criminal defense civil liberties litigator, author of The Shadow University: The Betrayal of of Liberty on America’s Campuses and Three Felonies a Day: How the Feds Target the Innocent, former ACLU attorney, partner of the aforementioned EFF, and co-founder of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), has many articles available at Reason Magazine, which is aptly named.

Whereas Law and the Multiverse serves to illustrate how legal actions might come to be decided in the worlds of fiction; comic book superpowers, science fiction, and even AMC’s drama Breaking Bad are all made the subject of legal analysis.

Micah Allen’s Neuroconscience researches brain plasticity and cognitive neuroscience, while Mo Costandi’s Neurophilosophy deals with

Phil Plait’s Bad Astronomy is astronomically great, and is hosted along with several other fascinating science blogs at Discover Magazine. If you enjoy a good skeptical dose like his, I would check out the above-mentioned Dr. Steven Novella’s NeuroLogica blog, his advocacy on Science-Based Medicine, or the contributions to Skepticblog along with the likes of Brian Dunning, Micahel Shermer and others.

Illusionist/Future World Dictator Derren Brown has lots of fun updates of stunning imagery, science, magic, psychology, skepticism and the supernatural, all especially appealing to my eclectic tastes. Author, psychologist and skeptic Richard Wiseman offers up puzzles, brain teasers and illusions each week that will make you want to show someone else.

Mind Hacks keeps readers abreast of the news in neuroscience and psychology, with the bold assertion that with such understanding, such tricks will help figure out one’s own brain.

I’ve recently become addicted to the grand ideas presented at Big Think. Similar to TED, you can find great links, lectures, and interviews, but in a much more condensed and potable form. Politics, science, society, and the mind are all game to their host of editors.

Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings is yet another brilliantly curated web resource for intellectual pursuers with a love for art, literature, photography, biography, science, philosophy, and historical oddities. I cannot emphasize how much I love Brain Pickings!

Especially significant of late in the wave of psychopaths taking control of our democracy, the Ponerology Blog details discoveries in the science of evil, spearheaded by Andrew M. Lobaczewski, Ph.D.

I also put together a little tumblr concerning the fate of the publishing and retail book industry in this historically significant shifting media landscape, dramatically titled Likely In Store.
As for food blogs, dire decadence demands that one consume updates from Fancy Fast Food, Insanewiches, Cook to Bang, This is Why You’re Fat and the Cheese Underground.

I’ll also occasionally head over to the Brothers Brick or Brick Testament to get my LEGO on, but I do worry that this may open up into a black hole of LEGO blogs for me.

Webcomics (Bonus!)

Of course I’ve been a lifelong fan of Penny Arcade and PvP, (as long as they’ve been live), and Brian Clevinger’s spritely 8-bit Theatre back in its day, and Diesel Sweeties, the robot romance webcomic. I’m also stunned by creatively experimental and remarkably crafted works like Scott McCloud’s Zot! Online, yuumei’s Knite or Demian5’s When I Am King. Pervs will enjoy S.S. Myra or Chester 5000 XYV. And just about anything anything with art by Scott Campbell, John Allison, or Kate Beaton.

I know I just fired a lot at you, and it’s all just the tip of the iceberg! But with an overabundance of digital information, news, discovery, curiosities and entertainment, we all have to be our own curators, or as author James William Powell puts it, our own ‘SPAM filters.’ Hopefully by pointing toward some of my favorite daily, weekly or monthly sources, I can help some curious internet wanderer in the future. Of course, it may all be different by then! At the very least it stands as yet another blog time capsule to what I ‘fed’ on at this point in my life.

I’m always looking for new sources! Of course, it goes without saying that Mutiny Radio should be your source for a much more streamlined helping of these sources! And Mutiny Radio is always looking for intrepid journalists, editors, aggregators or bloggers! Get a hold of me at thestranger@earthling.net!

Being for the Benefit of Mr. ____

There are (hay) 6.93 billion people on the planet, how many of them can you say you have known? Does your facebook friend count break 300? 1,000? Combine it with your old myspace or friendster and discount the duplicates. Your high school yearbook. Consider all the names you heard on the announcements in high school that might still pop up in your memory from time to time. Whether you live in the city or country, but especially if you work in retail, food or any other customer service industry, consider for a moment the number of beings you have personally interacted with. Even on vacation in distant lands at each stage of your life cycle (not to be confused with light cycle). What could that number possibly be? 10,000? Ridiculously low. 50,000? 1,000,000? 80,000,000? How many have you met, conversed briefly, irrevocably altered the course of their life in some minuscule way, or simply seen in a crowd? How many other humans in your lifetime will you come into contact with?

And yet, if we were to include all the imaginary, supposed, or fictional people whom we are aware of, that number would inflate, mayhaps even double (?!)

Imaginary peoples are not just for children and paranoiacs, though these are the clearest examples of actual interaction and acting for the benefit of invisible men. Actors and writers create imaginary people every day, and in fact you may know more about the personal habits, secret origins, likes and dislikes, relationship histories, etc. of these figures than many of your close-ish acquaintances, and certainly more than those casual encounters (not to be confused with the until-recently seedy portion of craigslist). We actually feel deep emotion for these imaginary characters.

People fantasize about their perfect mate(s), though there are millions of capable, willing, and virile possibilities that may be foolishly passed over for not being this ridiculously idealized imaginary one(s). How about the idealized person you ascribe to an actual person, only to realize later that they do not measure up. Do the two different versions count as two different beings in the compartmentalized recesses of your memory?

I cannot even count the number of people I have met in dreamtime who I never have or will meet in pathetic waking life. Beautiful women, disturbing monstrosities, and heroic allies, all of them distinct and memorable, all of them thoroughly nonexistent.

Children believe in Santa Claus, leaving food for him and awaiting with fervent glee his annual arrival, something that parents actively encourage, though fully aware of the con.

And Ockham’s Razor be damned, all things being equal, I much prefer to live in a world with Bigfoot than without.

And what about the impersonal people we are aware definitely exist, but may as well be invisible for all we know? The smoke-and-mirror show that surrounds us when we hear unknown neighbors arguing, a man clear his throat down on the street, the familiar jingle of keys in the door as we inquisitively attempt to guess their owner? You know about the people in your town, your state, your nation, your world. Many of them appear on television, senators, comedians, lawyers, used car salesmen, news anchors, local characters. This is but a fraction of the inhabitants of the vast heavenly sphere we call our home. Our ‘neighbors’ include the Koreans, the Malaysians, the Irish, the Tasmanians, and sometimes even the Dutch. But aside from those very few you may have run into, unless you have been to all of those places they are strangers to you, no different than the fictional inhabitants of Oz, Cimmeria, Middle Earth, or Ooo, any of which you may know more about. We take it on faith that the Japanese exist, much the same way that a child takes it on faith that Santa exists, or the Christian supposes Jesus. Who is to say who is right and who is wrong?

And HOW real are some of these people anyway? I refer, of course, to Matthew Lesko. I myself have constructed quite a mix of real and fictional personal history, intermingled on the internet for any curious onlooker to attempt parsing.

And with this newfangled inner nets (not to be confused with inner tubes), faceless masses no longer simply ride the same bus as you, they watch the same videos you do, violently argue with you, like your comments, have mutual friends, check in at the same places, and tweet about the same revolutions. Surely they must all exist, this is no Truman Show lie. But the anonymity that protects them also alienates them not only from physical human connection with you, but also in some small way from the conceptual acceptance in your mind that they are indeed physical beings. Can there be any doubt? But what if you are talking to a bot or mailer-dæmon? Who has the time to administer a Turing test to each and every digital invisible person you come across? Also, its socially gauche!

As I said, we do things for the benefit of these invisible peeps. We knock on a bathroom door for the potential invisible person that may be inside, lest we find ourselves in a temporary mildly embarrassing situation (not everyone does this, those of us on the receiving end sometime disastrously discover). Writers not only create fictional people, (and sometimes multiple continuities of them), but write for an audience of imaginary people they may never see, who are enjoying the exploits of their fictional heroes, often without ever knowing or acknowledging the actual writer’s name or efforts.

I wonder (aloud in case it matters) if anyone will ever read this blog post. Or if when I look back at the number of page views, if perhaps they all aren’t just myself looking back at them wondering.

With so many people on the planet and growing, how can our overwhelmed and overworked minds manage to keep track of so many non-persons? Why do we do it? Would you bother to stop if you found out how?