Tag Archives: dark knight rises

Bat-Fan

The night is dark over Gotham San Francisco, and crusaders of all variety battle the ne’er-do-wells wreaking crime, injustice, corruption, greed, and violence. Who are the real villains and heroes, and how can we stop them (short of donning a cowl and tights)? Well, bat-jazz, the batusi, and bat-dancing couldn’t hurt.

Read this if you think I am politicizing the Batman. He is far too complex for our feeble, mild-mannered minds to analyze his politics, philosophy, psychology, or sexuality.

Some days you just can’t get rid of a bomb.

PLAYLIST
In the Hall of the Mountain King – Duke Ellington
Batman The Animated Series Theme – Danny Elfman
Birth of the Batman – Shirley Walker
Flee For Your Life! – Nelson Riddle
Batman Blues – Nelson Riddle
Again – Lionel Newman
Plaisir D’Amour – Giovanni Martini
Robin’s Theme – Sun Ra
The Joker Is Wild – Jan & Dean
Batman Theme – Link Wray
Batman Riddles The Riddler! – or – (Hi Diddle Riddle) – Nelson Riddle
Batman – Lee Hazlewood
The Penguin The Marketts
Robin (Pt. 1-2) – The Revengers
The Cat Woman – The Marketts
Gotham City – Nelson Riddle
Catwoman’s Revenge – Power Records
Birth of the Penguin – Danny Elfman
Batman and the Joker Duel – Shirley Walker
Lasiurus – Hans Zimmer & James Newton Howard
The Batman Theme II – Andy Strumer
Genetic Theft – Jon Button/Michael McCuistion
Batdance – Prince
I Wupped Batman’s Ass – Wesley Willis
Watch The World Burn – Hans Zimmer & James Newton Howard
Gotham’s Reckoning – Hans Zimmer
Why So Serious? – Hans Zimmer & James Newton Howard
The Fire Rises – Hans Zimmer
Batman’s Destiny – Shirley Walker
Total Paranoia – Serj Tankian
Batman Theme – Neil Hefti

On Wednesday, the Senate passed a bill to extend the Bush tax cuts for everyone’s first $250,000 in income.

The legislation prevailed 51-48 — a vote that signals Democrats would ultimately be willing to allow tax cuts for high-income earners to expire at the end of the year. Although Republicans ended their filibuster, they voted against the measure, with Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-CT) and Jim Webb (D-VA) voting with them.

The GOP is standing in the way of middle-income tax cuts until wealthy Americans get a tax cut too. They’re working to keep much of America poor and unemployed.

Though research shows that unemployment and underemployment may lead to depression, suicide, crime and even violence.

Research shows that spells of unemployment for a young person often damage the person’s happiness and health for many years to come. The California unemployment rate is among the highest in the nation.

But global reports of the connection between mental health and employment prospects are showing us that young people often suffer from feelings of self-loathing, failure, panic, and a whole range of mental health problems during times of high joblessness.

recent study by the National Institutes of Health found that “youth unemployment is associated with an increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorder.” Unemployment, the study found, can also influence the course of pre-existing disorders. For young people facing a tough job market, the chances of tragedies increase: suicide rates spike, as does the incidence of violence. Budget cuts, shredded safety nets, and flawed health insurance make finding help more and more difficult for those who are suffering distress.

And much to our dismay, we find that we are not only living in a classist America, but a very much still racist America as well.

Romney’s strategy has incorporated racial and cultural cues, both subtle and blatant, as a means of deflection from the Obama campaign’s relentless offensive based on questions about Romney’s tenure at Bain Capital,

In short, the theme boiled down to this: remind those core voters that the stakes in this election include another four years with a black guy in the White House — Casting Obama as “other”, “foreign” or un-American.

The poll, conducted by Langer Research, found that among the non-black adults it surveyed, 62 percent “think blacks in their community don’t experience racial discrimination (a view at odds with what most blacks themselves report) Those same voters think African-Americans have an equal shot at success, and 59 percent expressed a preference for Romney in the presidential race. 19 percent of non-black respondents said they did not believe that blacks “tried as hard as people of other races to get ahead” and favored Romney 54 percent.

Non-black registered voters who think blacks do experience discrimination in the respondents’ own communities were far more likely to name Obama as their candidate, 56-37 percent.

Romney’s most recent spate of race plays began with his visit to the NAACP convention, where he dangled some bait asserted himself as the best candidate “for African American families,” Romney was clearly playing to the the white Republican base, whose leaders often express purported knowledge of what’s best for black people, and repeating the “free stuff” line, similar to Gingrich’s  “food stamp president.”

Romney surrogate John Sununu asserted that Obama was somehow foreign, having been partly raised in Indonesia, and then in [foreign?] Hawaii, where Sununu characterized him as “smoking something.” “I wish this president would learn how to be an American.” He apologized, but the whole thing was a distraction from Romney’s remarks: ” [Obama’s] course is extraordinarily foreign.”

This is all while Florida Gov. Rick Scott is purging ‘certain people’ from his state’s voter rolls, with some claims up to 87 percent so far have been people of color.

“Florida is a state with a history of disenfranchising blacks.”

Every Republican supports these racist manipulations, it seems, except for Florida’s former Republican Party chairman Jim Greer, who blew the lid off what he claims was a systemic effort to suppress the black vote. In a 630-page deposition recorded over two days in late May, Greer, who is on trial for corruption charges, unloaded a litany of charges against the “whack-a-do, right-wing crazies” in his party, including the effort to suppress the black vote.

In the deposition, released to the press yesterday, Greer mentioned a December 2009 meeting with party officials. “I was upset because the political consultants and staff were talking about voter suppression and keeping blacks from voting,” he said, according to the Tampa Bay Times. He also said party officials discussed how “minority outreach programs were not fit for the Republican Party,” according to the AP.

All despite the fact that no one can find reports of in-person voter fraud, the entire claimed purpose of the purges in the first place.

At a time when vast, disproportionate majorities of busts for small crimes (like personal pot possession) are dealt out to non-whites (despite white kids smoking most of the pot) in almost every major city, the Republican leadership is openly searching for new ways to disenfranchise minorities and their vote.

In the state’s notoriously botched 2000 election, the state sent a list of 50,000 alleged ex-felons to the counties, instructing them to purge those names from their rolls. But it turned out that list included 20,000 innocent people, 54 percent of whom were black, the magazine reported. Just 15 percent of the state’s population is black.

They’ve already used their scams to ensure that black Americans suffer more economic inequality and less mobility.

From 2005 to 2009, black wealth declined by 53 percent, African-American wealth was wiped out by the Great Recession, making it a tremendously destructive event for economic mobility among black families.

The African-American joblessness rate  surged to 14.4 percent in June, and shows no signs of going down.

And the class war rages on and on.

James Henry, a former chief economist at consultancy McKinsey and an expert on tax havens, has conducted groundbreaking new research for the Tax Justice Network campaign group – sifting through data from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS), the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and private sector analysts to construct an alarming picture that shows capital flooding out of countries across the world and disappearing into the cracks in the financial system.

“These estimates reveal a staggering failure,” says John Christensen of the Tax Justice Network. “Inequality is much, much worse than official statistics show, but politicians are still relying on trickle-down to transfer wealth to poorer people. This new data shows the exact opposite has happened: for three decades extraordinary wealth has been cascading into the offshore accounts of a tiny number of super-rich.”

The world’s super-rich have taken advantage of lax tax rules to siphon off at least $21 trillion, and possibly as much as $32tn, from their home countries and hide it abroad – a sum larger than the entire American economy.

All the more reason to see Mitt Romney’s tax returns. Who, by the way, spent his week raising even more foreign money, including two with bankers and lobbyists involved in the expanding Libor rate-fixing scandal. He’s worth about $200 million, and if elected, would be among the richest presidents ever to occupy the White House, topping both the Roosevelts and the Bushes , who were no slouches. In fact, he’s wealthier than the last eight presidents combined.

And remember, Ann Romney’s pet horse gets a $77,000 tax credit  when your kid gets $1,000.

Meanwhile… those few U.S. Representatives we like actually built enough momentum to pass Ron Paul’s bill to subject the Fed’s monetary policy to audits by the Government Accountability Office, a nonpartisan and independent congressional agency. As Dennis Kucinich, one of 89 Democrats to vote for the bill, put it: “It’s time that we stood up to the Federal Reserve that right now acts like some kind of high, exalted priesthood, unaccountable to democracy.” While the leadership of both parties fight against it.

This same left-right coalition, led by Paul and joined by liberal Democrats such as Alan Grayson, that succeeded in enacting an Audit the Fed bill back in 2010. Even though that 2010 bill was substantially weakened by the same forces that oppose the bill now — the Fed, the White House, and party leadership — that audit, once completed, “revealed 16 trillion dollars in secret bank bailouts and has raised more questions about the quasi-private agency’s opaque operations” and independently showed that the Fed ignored rules to aid the largest banks.

This is a clear case of socialism for the rich and rugged, you’re-on-your-own individualism for everyone else.” ~Bernie Sanders

In other words, the system is rigged in favor of the largest banks and their elites, so they play by their own set of rules to the disfavor of the taxpayers who funded their bailout. The incentives are to cheat, and cheating is profitable because there are no consequences.

The oligarchs are usually among the first to get extra help from the government, such as preferential access to foreign currency, or maybe a nice tax break, or—here’s a classic Kremlin bailout technique—the assumption of private debt obligations by the government. Meanwhile, needing to squeeze someone, most emerging-market governments look first to ordinary working folk—at least until the riots grow too large.

Despite what they’d like to convince us (and themselves), wealthy individuals and corporations need the help of government more than anybody:

“I owe the public nothing.” ~J. P. Morgan

  • The U.S. government will be spending $55 billion on Homeland Security next year, in addition to $673 billion for the military. The police, emergency services, and National Guard are trained to focus on crimes against wealth. (In cities, business interests keep police focused on the homeless and unemployed, and on drug users. Wealthy Americans rest better at night knowing that the police are “stopping and frisking” in the streets of the poor).
  • The wealthiest Americans are the main beneficiaries of tax laws, property rights, zoning rules, patent and copyright provisions, trade pacts, antitrust legislation, and contract regulations.
  • Their companies benefit, despite any publicly voiced objections to regulatory agencies, from SBA and SEC guidelines that generally favor business, and from FDA and USDA quality control measures that minimize consumer complaints and product recalls.
  • The growing numbers of financial industry executives have profited from 30 years of deregulation, most notably the repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act. Lobbying by the financial industry has prolonged the absurdity of a zero sales tax on financial transactions.
  • Federal judicial law protects our biggest companies from foreign infringement. The proposed Trans-Pacific Partnership would put governments around the world at the mercy of corporate decision-makers.
  • And did you know? Private jets use 16 percent of air traffic control resources while paying only 3% of the bill.

The traditional image of ‘welfare’ pales in comparison to corporate welfare and millionaire welfare. Whereas over 90% of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families goes to the elderly, the disabled, or working households, most of the annual $1.3 trillion in “tax expenditures” (tax subsidies from special deductions, exemptions, exclusions, credits, and loopholes) goes to the top quintile of taxpayers. One estimate is $250 billion a year just to the richest 1%. The most profitable corporations get the biggest subsidies. According to Citizens for Tax Justice, 280 profitable Fortune 500 companies, which together paid only half of the maximum 35 percent corporate tax rate, received $223 billion in tax subsidies. SEC documents show that Exxon paid 2% in U.S. federal taxes from 2008 to 2010, Chevron 4.8%. As if to double up on the insult, the petroleum industry readily takes public money for oil spills. Cleanups cost much more than the fines imposed on the companies. Government costs can run into the billions, or even tens of billions, of dollars.

All we can really hope for is that the rich will turn on each other, and since everyone was doing it, start to dime on each other in the wake of the Barclay’s LIBOR fraud.

The other banks still under investigation have, according to a Reuters report, strongly considered all jumping into the pool at the same time and trying for a group settlement with regulators. The regulators like the idea because it will involve a great big number and a big list of names. The banks are warming to the idea because the big list of names means no one firm gets the Barclays treatment. In other words, settle quick and hope no one digs too much into how much criminal activity each member of La Familia is responsible for.

But if the (mostly) uninvolved Goldman takes the law into their own hands with suits against the firms responsible, some serious shit is going to get stirred. Since nobody will actually go to jail for widespread fraud and conspiracy, perhaps they will just sue themselves into oblivion.

And as our democracy is threatened by the suppression of journalism (which wasn’t really doing much of it’s job anyway), the buying of America by the psychopathic 1%, and spying on nearly every single American, perhaps it’s time for a Constitutional Amendment to rescue us!

Facing more Conservative Judicial Activism, it will probably be difficult to undo the damage of legalized political bribery under Citizen’s United. Corporations are not granted regular human and citizen rights, but more rights than the rest of us.

Many of our constitutional amendments were passed in reaction to ideal-driven justices serving the enemies of social justice and liberty, and most have been franchise-expanding and democracy-reinforcing provisions that strengthen the progress of what Lincoln called “government of the people, by the people and for the people.”

Now, our government even admits that it’s violating our civil rights.

The U.S. government violated the American people’s rights to privacy protected under the Fourth Amendment at least once under FISA. A letter received from the Office of the Director of National Intelligence reported that the government has been abusing its new surveillance powers. It was admitted by the Director of National Intelligence that the U.S. has been making “unreasonable searches and surveillances.”

Cell phone records show at least 1.3 million government requests for customer data last year, ranging from subscriber identifying information to call detail records, geolocation tracking, text messages, and full-blown wiretaps. And this is probably an understatement, since they are pulling data from cell phone towers used by everyone, and neither corporation nor government agency is deleting information in a timely manner.

“Domestically, they’re pulling together all the data about virtually every U.S. citizen in the country and assembling that information, building communities that you have relationships with, and knowledge about you; what your activities are; what you’re doing. So the government is accumulating that kind of information about every individual person and it’s a very dangerous process.”

~former NSA Technical Director William Binney

Our Congress is having difficulty finding the details, and apparently even other judges are in the dark concerning the secret court orders allowing surveillance. And Department of Homeland Security Sec. Napolitano wants more drones in your backyard!

And the NYPD probably breaks international law in their quest to surveil, suppress, assault and otherwise over-police the Occupy protestors.

The report, which chronicles events from late September 2011 up to July of 2012, extensively documents numerous ways in which the NYPD acted with excessive force, attempted to intimidate and harass members of the press and expelled activists from public space due to the content of their speech. This resulted in at least 85 instances of police arrests of journalists, 130 incidents of violence committed against Occupy activists, including punching, over-hand swinging of batons, and “intentionally applying very hard force to the broken clavicle of a handcuffed and compliant individual.”

The executive summary states, in plain language:

“The abusive practices documented in this report violate international law and suppress and chill protest rights, not only by undermining individual liberty, but also by causing both minor and serious physical injuries, inhibiting collective debate and the capacity to effectively press for social and economic change, and making people afraid to attend otherwise peaceful assemblies.”

“The evidence strongly suggests that police use of force was unnecessary and disproportionate, in violation of international law.”

Even doing art in chalk on the sidewalk is a misdemeanor offense… if you’re an activist, that is. Yeah, this isn’t political targeting at all.

Stranger in a Strange Land 2012-07-28: Bat-Fan! by The Stranger on Mixcloud

~The Stranger
thestranger@earthling.net

“Tune in next week: same bat-time, same bat-channel!”

Advertisements

The Lie of the Conservative Batman

I’ve waited a week to post this until enough people have had a chance to see the latest Dark Knight movie, but it bears mentioning: MASSIVE SPOILERS AHEAD!

The Batman mythos runs so deep in our culture, that parallels are easy. Claims now run rampant that the latest brilliant installment of Christopher Nolan‘s Dark Knight trilogy is anti-Occupy, or pro-capitalist in sentiment. That it purports ‘only a billionaire’ can save us. Chris Nolan has dispelled as much, though it’s not unreasonable to suggest that the phenomenally successful series may be inexorably linked to current events, as no writer or director creates in a vacuum, and both life imitates art and art imitates life. All films reflect their times, and the Batman is no exception. The imagery itself has seeped into everyday usage, (much like the protagonist masks in V for Vendetta), the war-painted Joker has been used by protest movements to vilify seemingly every elite from Bernie Madoff to president Barack Obama. Even without the gadgetry, moral code, genius-level detective skills, martial arts, cape or cowl, many billionaires see themselves as crucial heroes, their “sacrifices” necessary for the good of the system. And yes, the probably psychopathic James Holmes seems unable or unwilling to separate reality from fiction, modeling himself after The Dark Knight‘s villainous Joker (portrayed inimitably by Heath Ledger).

But Christopher Nolan’s version of the Batman (dubbed the Nolanverse), had already established an old Gotham rife with political corruption, a recession predating our own by a few years (Batman Begins began in 2005), the excesses of the rich and inequity of their system, and the thievery of Wall Street.

The script for The Dark Knight Rises was written during 2010, with location scouting happening in December of that year. Filming ran from May to November 2011, overlapping the rise of the Occupy movement by mere months. Any similarity is purely coincidental, and furthermore seen through the lens of Fox news analysis and FBI entrapment, where Occupiers have already been condemned as criminals and terrorists. The predominant Beltway philosophy already has established the ‘infallible rich’ as a cornerstone of its power structure.

And the story of haves and have-nots is as old as time anyway, as the Dark Knight Rises draws heavily from A Tale of Two Cities and its historical Red Terror. It’s a false dichotomy (which many pundits love) that one cannot have both a healthy opposition to violent revolution and sympathetic support for a protest movement. It really reveals more about the claimants’ ideology than anything else. Charles Dickens, for one, cared deeply for the plight of the poor, but not for the brutal atrocities of the French Revolution.

We humans will ascribe our own meaning and see what we want in film and comic book escapism, no matter how earnest the telling. This trilogy simply rings true because it dissects the hard ideological differences regarding justice, evil, truth, responsibility, and just exactly who is the real psychopath, anyway. We can all too easily see the divides and overlapping philosophies of the Occupy movement, the police force, the rich elites, and the League of Shadows. And yes, both lone vigilantes and lone nuts.

But even if the movie were a direct allegory to our failed structure, it could hardly be seen as a conservative endorsement, as bloggers on both sides have contended. More likely, the chilling dystopian vision of a city torn into a No Man’s Land reads as a warning against radical demagoguery and institutional deception. And though some may not agree with the aims of the Occupy movement, it takes a willfully ignorant or forcefully disingenuous mindset to equate them with the insane philosophy of either a chaotically sadistic Joker or a frighteningly focused and cold-blooded Bane (portrayed by Tom Hardy).

Indeed, Occupy remains a leaderless movement, constantly worrying about being co-opted by self-interested parties. Bane adopts a populist message in order to peddle false hopes to the citizenry he hopes to torture, populating his army with liberated thieves and killers. Yes, and there are those whom society has forsaken. Bane’s armed revolt plays to the same paranoid fears of Fox News and the State Department, and the same rhetoric of a much less radical Anonymous; it is made up of janitors, shoe-shiners, orphans, ex-cons, sanitation and construction workers. The under-served.

Bruce Wayne’s (reprised by Christian Bale) sins are spelled out for us at the beginning of the Dark Knight Rises. Not only has he taken the fall for the crimes of Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart) and conspired to propagate a political lie, he has turned his back on society and the world. The streets have become relatively clean without him in the eight years since he donned the cowl, but the less obvious ills of a broken system still endure as Bruce neglects the city he loves, and literally atrophies in his elegantly rebuilt mansion.

Gotham’s sins are also many, where betrayal and lies are common political practice, where war heros are expendable during peacetime, where critical-thinking police are discounted as ‘hotheads’, and where even good men like Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) get their hands filthy. The Batman himself, as the Force-ghost of Ra’s Al-Ghul (Liam Neeson) reminds us, “for years fought the decadence of Gotham with his moral authority… and the most he could achieve was a lie.” The overreaching Dent Act, based on Jim Gordon and Bruce Wayne’s falsehood, has robbed the imprisoned of any chance of parole. And though it was (hurriedly) agreed that if they world knew of Harvey Dent’s crimes, the guilty would be opened up to appeal, it is this very act of conspiracy that threatens to help blow apart the system, once finally discovered. The career politicians, police bosses, day traders and rich elite are anything but sympathetic figures.

Selena Kyle (Anne Hathaway) is the only decent representative of the 99%. She (as well as her politics and moral code) is adaptable, values anonymity, and doesn’t seem to care much for gun control. She embodies the ‘honor among thieves’ adage, she is generous, and sees herself as somewhat of a Robin Hood, at least more than the society types she robs from, who ‘take so much and leave so little for the rest.’ However, she is equally horrified, frightened and disgusted by the madness that ensues during Bane’s “revolution.”

John Daggett (Ben Mendelsohn), on the other hand, is your stereotypical corporate vulture, a literal blood diamond opportunist looking for his next hostile takeover, who doesn’t have time for “save-the-world vanity projects.” In fact, Daggett doesn’t care if the world is destroyed with his help, so long as he acquires more money, and the “power it buys.” It is the likes of Daggett and the other one-dimensional capitalists who worship the status quo when it suits them, and then collude with criminals on the side. Daggett only sees Bane as ‘pure evil’ once he realizes the imminent threat to himself and his riches. Once it’s no longer himself who’s in charge. It should be noted, for the record, that there are no real-life Occupy figures who could cow a crooked billionaire by placing a hand on their shoulder like an alpha dominant.

But of course these unsympathetic crooks are surely served up as contrast to our hero: the billionaire who would save us.

And though the Batman/Bruce Wayne may be heralded as the authoritarian’s dream; willing to employ mass surveillance, extreme rendition, and solely deciding what technology the people deserve and can be trusted with, he is no societal Superman. He is not a billionaire’s billionaire, for though he has more cars than cares to count, has never answered his own door, and “doesn’t even go broke like the rest of us,” he is also easily displaced within his own boardroom, decries the egotistical hypocrisy of charity balls, and has not been watching his own money carefully. Notably, he wants to fail. He relishes the opportunity to be destroyed as the Batman, if it means saving the lives of everyone; the rich, the workers and the poor alike.

Neither, however, has he been serving his own people and city of late, trading in his once rich playboy identity for a Howard Hughes shtick. Not only is his corporation floundering, his beloved charitable foundation is practically defunct. Orphaned boys age out of Gotham’s social programs, neglected by a city with no homes of jobs available. Here they become easy prey for vaguely Middle Eastern terrorists and organized criminals, where they die in the sewers and wash away once they are used up.

The progressive responsibility of socially conscious and civic-minded billionaires, (an extremely endangered breed both in Gotham and out real world) had to be summed up by an ecoterrorist acting the part of a lovely socialite (Marion Cotillard); “You have to invest to restore balance to the world.” Bruce has been lacking in his duties, and that evil that he and Commissioner Gordon buried isn’t dead, but rising up once again.

Bane’s movement is a false one, as he tells the people of Gotham that he is not a Conquerer but a Liberator, but in actuality he is neither. Bane is the Destroyer. Spinning a hopeful message in the wake of his havoc, telling the people to “take control” of Gotham, Bane uses his “truth” to get the citizenry to “tear down a corrupt city” and reclaim what is theirs from the rich oppressors who had peddled their myth of opportunism.

And it is not just any “ordinary citizen” who holds the detonator to their destruction, but equal parts rich girl and terrorist-anarchist. These masterminds did not just create a populist movement to fulfill their diabolical plot, but infiltrated powerful corporations with their subterfuge as well. For comparison, real-world anarchists, despite practicing just another political philosophy, are readily depicted by the media as murderous terrorists. Protestors, despite exercising their constitutional right to assemble, are either beaten or made into bridge bombers by the FBI. Even those who have read the anarchist or socialist literature pale in comparison to the bloodthirsty Bane army. But the fear has been writ large in the news: if a lone nut like the joker can inspire a depraved massacre in a theatre, what would an evil warlord and his army of mercenaries inspire?

Like the Batman, authoritarians do seem to create their own enemies.

What follows once the structures fail lacks even more subtlety; in the face of such wanton violence, the government will abandon you. The good cops will attempt to salvage the status quo, and the bad cops will either desert or work against the people. Idiotically and blindly following orders, in fact, could get orphans and priests killed. Only the Batman can save us.

As even Selena realizes too late, this is not what the 99% ever wanted. Their system has swung wildly from an authoritarian, decadent state to the bloody turf of a mad warlord. It is the Dark Knight who is the hero we need, but unlike any known billionaire, he is now humiliated and humbled, fearful, responsible, accountable, and thus strengthened, empowered, respectful and focused. “Hardened by pain… not from privilege.”

It really should go without saying, by the way, that is not until Bruce Wayne loses all of his money, loses nearly everything, in fact, and is dropped into a pit to rebuild himself, that he is worthy of becoming a savior. And even those he still uses all those wonderful toys that only his privileged life could have afforded him, there can be no analogue for his virtuosity. Nobody has done as much as the fictitious Wayne family. And no playboy industrialists don a mask and fight crime.

As super-fan of the Batman, Kevin Smith, points out:

“In our world it’s not the case. The richer one gets, the less moral one seems to become. Not in all cases, but you hear about everything that just happened to our economy in the last few years… at the end of the day, Bruce Wayne/Batman [is] a moral example of a billionaire… Right then and there you should be able to divorce yourself from reality because no billionaire would waste their time helping others.”

This establishes the film’s central conceit as high fantasy. The Batman doesn’t have what we’d normally call superpowers, and we’ve seen it’s not simply the gadgets or money that keeps him going, but his rigid moral compass and drive to do good that makes him superhuman.

It isn’t just allegorical. It’s not just a cautionary tale. It’s a mad thought experiment. Fiction. Fantasy. Though some of us do have trouble separating that.

For there is no Ayn Randian perfect citizen or engine of the economy that somehow magically makes everything better. There is no Nietzschean Übermench. In the face of the very real threats of depraved elites, deadly terrorist groups and savage gunmen, there are no real superheroes.

Batman will not save us.